Saturday, January 10, 2015

An Unreasonable Discontinuity

The difficulty arises when concern for the truth of creation, expressed in symbolic language begins to dictate the physical events through which humanity originated. The scientist reasonably asks why it was necessary that humanity suddenly had to be unlike the biological nature which gave him form? The state of original innocence does precisely that. The scientist does not deny the possibility of ensoulment, that is God's associating the individual human person with His own divine existence, making the individual immortal in preparation for a life with God after physical death. Science has no interest in that and no way to deal with it. But since the human biological nature at present is constituted genetically and metabolically the same as all other animal life and when the only reasonable explanation for this is the process of biological evolution, then any interruption of this process seems unreasonable and unnecessary. This is the objection scientists have to creationism and our theology would be well advised to agree.

Joseph, William (2012-02-10). In Search of Adam and Eve (p. 210). Kindle Edition.

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