Tuesday, March 31, 2009

We Get Mail Dept.
Like many Americans, Mike from Manomet, (whose real identity will not be revealed for his protection), has had enough of network television.

He writes:
Where do you get your news? I'm sick of the f&%!king mainstream media; most of it is unwatchable bullshit: spin, red vs. blue, R's vs. D's, black people do this, white people do that, our poll..., their poll.... ad nauseum. What a bunch of crap.

That f&%!king blonde [bimbo] on ABC's Good Morning America aired a piece about five-to-seven year old girls' perceptions of beauty in colored dolls this morning. They placed two baby dolls, one black, one white [pink & brown] on the table in front of several girls - one girl at a time - and asked:

"Which is the pretty doll?" (majority picked the pink one)
"Why do you like that one?" (various answers you'd expect from a 6 year old: 'shiny, liked the color...')
"Which one is the 'ugly' doll?"

[!!!]

I'm not making this up! You should have seen the girls' faces when confronted with that leading question, trying to explain why they, the girls, thought the brown dolls ugly, when of course they hadn't.

BTW, all the girls were black or brown, and were confronted with the color comparison of their skin, to that of the 'ugly' doll, after the initial quiz.

Nice, eh?

This is the same [bimbo] who went to North Korea last year, showed 'fashion' magazines in classrooms to North Korean high school girls (Cosmopolitan et al.) and asked: "Don't you want to be and look like American girls (women)?"

In a victory for self esteem, they all said "no". Some eloquently and patiently explained why to the tall blonde [bimbo] with the magazines, who claimed to be representing our country.

(Who's brain, did you say, has been washed?)

[Hold on, Halle Berry just appeared on the tube.]

Mike Updates: I think the kids were eight years old, not five-to-seven; and 47%, or nearly half of the girls said the white doll was "the pretty doll" before being asked "Which is the ugly doll?" - not the majority of girls as I previously wrote. My bad. (Of course ABC only showed the kids' answers that fit their edit - all picking the white doll - so what you see is what you get.)

Still, what could be the motivation for asking an African-American child which of the two is the ugly doll? (Come on kiddo, there's only one left.)
Perhaps asking "Do you see an ugly doll?" would not result in the desired supporting "evidence" to suit the story.

It's interesting to see how researchers or "journalists" use leading questions to obtain answers to suit their goals. Prompting respondents to answer in a particular way, though clever, is deceitful. And children's desire to please adults can make them especially susceptible to such tactics. It might help the show's ratings, but I wouldn't want these people around my kids.

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