Friday, April 04, 2008

The Boskone Panel I was on in February with Br. Guy Consolmagno and Mike Flynn is now viewable online here. Description from the program schedule: What happened in the Middle Ages which lead to the rise of modern science? Why did it happen first in Europe and not elsewhere? How did science grow if the Middle Ages were really an "age of faith" without reason?

Scroll down to #25 at the bottom of the page. It's in Real Player format, which I'm not a huge fan of, but Richard Amirault who shot and encoded it clearly knows his tools. Quality is excellent.
(Now, if I'd just learn to stop slouching ...)

4 comments:

Bob said...

After listening to this great and informative discussion, the one line that I can't get out of my head is, "Have you two rehearsed this?"
Priceless....

BTW, I was listening to the talk on the mp3 format. Please tell me that Michael Flynn was using notes. If not, then wow!

John Farrell said...

He was using notes. And I was kicking myself that I didn't bring mine. We both have the same source books (pretty funny).

I'm glad that line came out clearly...in the video I think it gets swallowed.

(I still think they did rehearse it!)

Brandon said...

You sound less Boston-y than I expected.

That was a great panel; very informative. Flynn slipped a bit in attributing the word 'scientist' to an American -- the usual attribution is to Whewell, who was very certainly British. Perhaps he was thinking of C. S. Peirce, who certainly uses the term extensively? In any case, it's the sort of slip anyone might make when having to recall something suddenly from memory. I was very impressed at the research that everyone on the panel had obviously put into the subject.

John Farrell said...

You sound less Boston-y than I expected.

Thanks, Brandon! Just before college I went to a week-long training program at UNC Chapel Hill in radio and television. I was the only northerner there, and was mercillessly ribbed all week long about my accent. From thenceforth I began over-pronouncing my 'r's...

I think you're right about Whewall.