Friday, June 14, 2002

News: It now looks like Boston has become the dumping ground for "artists" who can't get themselves a gig in Provincetown. My esteem for Provincetown culture went up when I read in today's Globe (Living Section) a pathetic attempt to paint an artist out of a 49-year-old bimbo who's gig is to perform cabarets in restaurants in a slinky dress while verbally abusing the customers. The woman can't get a placement in any Provincetown restaurants. So, naturally she gravitated to Boston where, as the cliche goes, the city needs her.

Here's more boilerplate from the Globe's article (no link because the Globe archives its stuff behind a subscription barrier after one day). It's written by correspondent Reilly Capps, who must be desperately starved for a real assignment:

Sure, some people don't get it. Casey's working-class roots and her Irish tongue get the best of her sometimes, and she loves to mess with the bourgeoisie. ''This is why I was put on the earth,'' she says, ''to drive these people insane.''

Her quips may get her fired from Il Bico soon enough. Even if that happens, she won't quit.

''I have to stay with it, because I can't say, `I used to be in the theater, I used to be a singer,''' Casey says.

''I could never be an ex-performer. I'd feel like a true failure. That, to me, would be heartbreaking.''

She's lingering over a now-empty glass of red wine as the last patrons file out. She'll be back at Il Bico tonight and every Friday ... assuming.

''I'm gonna give her some more chances,'' says Il Bico owner Donna Franca Franzaroli. ''I'd like to see her successful.''

Casey, who works as a yoga teacher to pay the rent, says she wants to stay in Boston, to shake things up a bit, to shock the city out of its self-satisfied stateliness. To get some blue blood boiling.

''They need me here,'' says Casey. ''They don't need me in California or in Europe. They'd get me there. They need me here. They don't know it, but they need it.''


This crap follows the most tired paradigm of entertainment journalism. That somehow, an artist whose sole marketing ploy is to garner attention by being a jerk, is really doing the local community a service with her 'honesty'. That's right: Boston, the education capital of the country, needs this half-wit to give us a lesson in what real art and entertainment is all about.

If Casey was content to do her schtick because it was fun and she enjoyed aggravating people, that would be fine. It's a free country. But the continued degradation of art in the media through the idiotic insistence that the most execrable forms of entertainment are somehow dignified by an invented 'struggle' to be honest is contemptible.

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